Tuesday, September 23, 2014

New poem: The Fear (unfinished)

It was said,
“be afraid.”

And the people became afraid.

I stood, 
a dwarf in a petrified forest,
watching them dance the ancient dance —
there seemed joy in their terror,
& laughter, too.

People baked bullets into their bread.
They chopped up newspapers
& fried them
with sliced onions & sizzling steaks.
They stroked surveillance cameras
between their legs.
They treated TV screens like wells,
dipping buckets into them,
filling teacups
& offering them to neighbours.

At times it held the shape of mirrors & men,
but mostly,
the Fear spread across the waking earth 
as if it were gas

& gas expands to fill
whatever vessel
it is put in.

Today,
A man would not serve me at the supermarket.
A woman crossed the street to avoid me.
An anonymous email wished death upon me.

I, too,

became afraid.

6 comments:

Ros T said...

Hi Omar, just listened to you on Poetica. Thanks for introducing me to Anne Sexton. I'm not sure about your background but you appear Muslim and you are young. Your poem may reminds us that the politics of fear make Australia a weak, unfriendly country. Great to have a poetic voice like yours making sense. Ros T

Ricky Ricardo said...

Nice man thanks for share.

Ricky Ricardo said...

Nice man thanks for share.

milanameytes said...

I could not think of a better way to get in contact so here is my spiel :)

Hello Mr. Musa,

My name is Milana Meytes, a senior at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, USA. I am writing in order to get in contact with you in regards to my Watson project. As a Watson Finalist I have immense interest in her work and hope to connect with her. The Watson fellowship grants the opportunities for select individuals to pursue a certain passion of theirs internationally, in up to six countries. I hope to work with Refugees,Diasporic communities and Exiled Writers that are involved in creative writing. I am a diasporic and refugee writer myself from the former USSR and have been involved with various creative writing activities and storytelling for the past eight or so years.

Your work fits my personal passions and my investigation into the crossroads of storytelling and displacement.I admire your work with these projects and wanted to reach out individually to you as a workshop facilitator and author.If I am granted the Watson Fellowship I would love to be able to work with/ connect with you in Australia- As a participant, mentor, listener, facilitator (of a workshop) or in any regard. If there is any further contact information or any other programs that fit my project's themes, those contacts will be much appreciated (including individuals).

I would be more than happy to attach my project personal statement and proposal in order to clarify.

I hope we can get in contact and be able to discuss future possibilities and collaboration. Is telephone easiest?

Thank you,

Milana

milanameytes said...

I could not find a better way fo getting in contact with you so here is my spiel :)

Hello Mr. Musa,

My name is Milana Meytes, a senior at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, USA. I am writing in order to get in contact with you in regards to my Watson project. As a Watson Finalist I have immense interest in her work and hope to connect with her. The Watson fellowship grants the opportunities for select individuals to pursue a certain passion of theirs internationally, in up to six countries. I hope to work with Refugees,Diasporic communities and Exiled Writers that are involved in creative writing. I am a diasporic and refugee writer myself from the former USSR and have been involved with various creative writing activities and storytelling for the past eight or so years.

Your work fits my personal passions and my investigation into the crossroads of storytelling and displacement.I admire your work with these projects and wanted to reach out individually to you as a workshop facilitator and author.If I am granted the Watson Fellowship I would love to be able to work with/ connect with you in Australia- As a participant, mentor, listener, facilitator (of a workshop) or in any regard. If there is any further contact information or any other programs that fit my project's themes, those contacts will be much appreciated (including individuals).

I would be more than happy to attach my project personal statement and proposal in order to clarify.

I hope we can get in contact and be able to discuss future possibilities and collaboration. Telephone or email would be easiest.

Thank you,

Milana

Jim KABLE said...

Dear Omar, earlier this year I read your brilliant: Here Come the Dogs - after reading a couple of newspaper reviews. Not disappointed! Stunningly powerful writing. To-night I saw you on Jennifer Byrne's literature program with marieke Hardy et al. How impressive your summation of Richard Flanagan's Booker win with The Narrow Road to the Deep North. I lived 16 years in western Japan (I'm 65) solid study over the past 25 years of Australia/Japan relations and connections - "the war" pretty central to much of it - of course. His book is moving and lyrical and generous and heart-achingly real. And I was so moved (yet again) by your reading of Once Were Warriors - which I read in 1990 - and how you related it back to the colonising pat - the effects of dispossession culturally and sovereignty-wise. Forgive that clumsiness of expression! I'm just returned from a month in the US where I purchased just published Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz - An Indigenous Peoples' History of the U.S. - a kind of tribute to one of her historian heroes (and mine) HOWARD Zinn and his A People's History of the U.S.! It tells the story of terra nullius United States and its genocide of peoples across its entire territorial theft and expansion - along with its mythical self-vaunted "manifest destiny" bullshit. A template for what happened to Indigenous peoples in Australia! Anyway, Omar - congratulations on your book - and bravo for your appearance to-night!11289